Posts Tagged ‘DELMARVA peninsula’

Elegant Waterfront Home For Sale On The Eastern Shore of Virginia Designed By William E. Poole

Thursday, March 7th, 2013

A Storybook Setting for this French Provincial

Standing proudly on a high knoll overlooking a broad expanse of  rippling blue saltwaters  on the  Eastern Shore of  Virginia is  this like-new William E. Poole designed home.   Poole, an internationally famous Southern architect based in Wilmington, S.C. ,   is especially known for creating comfortable homes featuring warm and romantic living environments. That talent is evident throughout this elegant  Chesapeake Bay area like-new brick  home of about 4700 sq. ft. for sale.  Inspired by  French Provincial Revival traditions yet designed for today’s conveniences,  the house is positioned to  fit perfectly into the site.  One of about 20 homes in a tiny neighborhood of  upscale waterfront homes near Franktown, VA  and shielded from the little  winding roadway  by  a stand of mature  trees,  as you drive up  the house seems to be  peeking out, wanting to see what’s going on.

Enjoy beautiful waterfront views from the veranda

The approach to the entrance from the circular drive is across a patterned brick  walkway to an entrance portico and an impressive solid mahogany circle top front door.  Once inside the spacious foyer, which features  an elaborate barrel style vaulted ceiling and entry columns, one’s eye is immediately drawn to the gorgeous water views from the great room beyond.


Jarvis dock at sunsetGreat pains have been taken to connect the interior spaces to the natural beauty of the outdoors.   A bold picture window,  flanked by tall doors on either side, is the dramatic focal point of the great room, presenting as it does the mesmerizing vistas of the broad blue inlet beyond.  Given the very desirable southwest exposure of this home, sunsets seen through that wide expanse of glass are absolutely spectacular.  ( A very important feature for those who, like moi, are not always in, shall we say,  top form at sunrise but who really love a great sunset.)  Another focal point in the great room is the sunstantial fireplace with marble hearth and surround, elaborate mantel with dentil molding and frieze plus raised panel overmantel.  Outside, a covered tiled veranda,  the epitomy of  relaxation, runs the most of the length of the entire house and is  the perfect place to enjoy a light lunch or savor a refreshing glass of Chardonnay on a breezy summer’s day.

This Chef’s Kitchen will inspire gourmet creations.

Divided from the great room and morning room by  partial walls with archways and fluted pilasters, the chef’s kitchen  is central to everything, the soul of the house.  Custom cherry cabinets, honed counters, also sculpted around the sink, custom tile, decorative tile backsplash behind gas cooktop, double ovens, extra deep storage drawers, oversized Lazy Susan corner cabinet and large pantry with frosted glass doors are just a few of the features which make this a superlative place to whip up everything from a simple coddled egg to an elaborate 6 course meal. The adjacent, quite spacious dining room features a lovely chandelier with embossed silk shades and elaborate ceiling medallion, a beautiful room in which to enjoy entertaining friends and family.

Spacious Master Bath Suite

The first thing you notice when entering the master suite is the stunning waterview through the glass side panels and French doors which also combine to allow lots of natural light to flow into the room, giving it a bright and airy feel. And the private tiled covered veranda off the master bedroom offers a secluded nook for relaxing outdoors away from any activities in other areas of the house. But the piece’ de resistance is the master bath suite. Featuring two separate colorful bombe style dressers as sink vanities, a roomy claw foot tub, large glass shower and a super-sized walk-in closet with large dresser organizer and beaucoup space for shoes and clothes plus plenty of linen storage space, this bathroom is dressed to the nines !

Reading Alcove

Cherry steps lead upstairs to an office, another bedroom, a bathroom, and a media room. A cozy little reading alcove for guests in the overlook to the great room below offers bookshelves and relaxing space for visitors away from activity elsewhere in the house. (Speaking of the overlook, did I mention that the great room has a soaring 19 foot ceiling ? And a handsome fireplace with elaborate mantel and marble hearth and surround  ?  Or that the floors on the first floor are cherry ?  Or that the morning room is amazing, with windows on 3 sides ? Plus lots, lots more ? ). Actually, this whole house is amazing. And it sits on a spectacular waterfront parcel which includes a backyard dock and boat lift complete with good boating water and easy access to the Chesapeake Bay. To see it on-line click on or call 757-678-5200 for a showing.      ( Posted by Marlene Cree, licensed Virginia agent with Blue Heron Realty Co., 7134 Wilsonia Neck Dr., Machipongo, VA )

A Guided Tour of the Chesapeake Bay Bridge-Tunnel Which Connects Virginia’s Eastern Shore to Mainland Virginia

Tuesday, September 27th, 2011

Tuesday, September 6, 2011, promised to be a memorable day what with the tour by our US Coast Guard Auxiliary Cape Charles 12-02 Unit of one of the great engineering marvels of the modern world,  the amazing  17 mile long  Chesapeake Bay Bridge-Tunnel complex. Our group gathered at the north end of this transportation wonder which  is so important to the economy of the Eastern Shore of Virginia as it connects our area,  which is the southern tip of the DELMARVA peninsula,  to the mother ship,   mainland Virginia.   There we all were ushered into the wood panelled meeting room of the complex’s Board of Directors and seated in plush leather swivel chairs at an immense, polished mahogany conference table where we were warmly greeted by Mr. Jeff Holland, the executive director of the complex and his assistant Paige Addison.  Jeff took great pains to explain to us the history of the Bridge-tunnel from its inception all the way through its construction, carefully illustrating with a slide show its ground-breaking engineering.  As well, we learned about its ongoing maintenance, its operation, considerations for future improvements, its funding and security issues. As one who has driven across this complex countless times, even during extreme weather events and electrical outages, and even having been rescued by their emergency personnel, I was amazed by the quality and quantity of new information I gathered.

Jeff Holland, Executive Director of the CBB-T, points out the Thimble Shoals Channel of the bridge-tunnel to Milton Hickman, son of a former longtime director of the complex.

Our group was then given toll passes to allow us to travel south over the bridges and through both tunnels to park on the first island near the restaurant and visitor’s center.  Jeff took time to point out the massive construction of the islands and the bridge trestles, and pointing out to us the shipping channels that the underground tunnels span. Observation points on the island afford visitors and travelers an incredible perspective of the mouth of the Chesapeake Bay where it meets the Atlantic Ocean. Also, there is a fishing pier that has special lighting underneath that attracts schools of bait fish to the surface, making the pier a great attraction for fishermen casting from the pier above them.  While we were observing this incredible scene, Jeff pointed out to us a very special ship making her way east through the Thimble Shoals Channel.  She is the USS New York, a US Navy warship, which was built with steel salvaged from the site of the World Trade Center after its destruction on September 11, 2001.  How poignant that we should be touring this facility just a few days before the tenth anniversary of that event  just as  she was passing by.

USS New York passes through the Chesapeake Bay Bridge-Tunnel on her way to the tenth memorial anniversary of the destruction of the World Trade Center on Sept. 11, 2001.

Next, our group was lead into the garage bay of the island’s ventilation and maintenance building where we were informed by the director of safety, Mr. Jim Davis, of  how the public is protected by their  extensive traffic safety procedures and response to breakdowns and accidents. It seemed that every conceivable emergency has been considered and planned for,  which spoke so highly of the professionalism and dedication of the employees of the Bridge-tunnel.


Traffic Safety Director Mr. Jim Davis, in front of fishing pier, explains the complex's focus on safety.Inside the ventilation and control b uilding on the first island.

After a most interesting, as well as reassuring, explanation of the Chespeake Bay Bridge-Tunnels traffic safety and engineering standards, our group was then ushered into the ventilation area where we got our exercise for the day by descending five stories down to the level of the underwater/underground tunnel crossing beneath the Thimble Shoals Channel.  It was explained to us that the tunnels were engineered to allow for open shipping channels into the world’s largest naval base in Norfolk, VA, which could be especially  critical in a time of war.  A bridge could be destroyed and thus block such channels, but not the underground tunnels which would always be open for the Navy’s ships.   Mr. Tee Wells, a superintendent of the facility, escorted us through a steel door in the thick concrete walls that lead us onto the sidewalk in the Thimble Shoals tunnel. The noise of the traffic was amplified and reflected by the tunnels walls,  especially loud when an eighteen wheeler passed by.

Standing on the walkway next to traffic in the Thimble Shoal tunnel.

Re-climbing and catching our breath, our group re-entered the ventilation building with a big sigh of relief.  And then we climbed one more story up where we could walk above the tunnel’s traffic lanes in the ventilation shafts. Ventilating the tunnels is essential to removing the carbon monoxide produced by the traffic and the huge fans exchange the air every few minutes.  Up in the ducts above the tunnels, the space is pitch black dark  but through the vents in the ceiling, we could watch the traffic passing below us!

Finishing our tour of the ventilation works, we then entered the secured control room where an experienced operator is on duty 24 hours a day, all year round.  The operator has at his command a dozen monitors that give him a view of all areas of the tunnel’s roadway,  the ventilation buildings and the parking lots on the island. There we were given an exciting overview about  the complex’s  very high security standards and abilities.  Let’s just say that the war on terror is being fought right here at home and that  this world class transportation facility is right in sync  with detailed guidelines and high standards of terrorism awareness and facility protection.  And after learning so much about the operations of the  Bridge-tunnel complex,  I shall  definitely feel  even more  safe each and every time I cross this increadible engineering achievement.